todayinhistory

todayinhistory:

August 22nd 1910: Japan annexes Korea

On this day in 1910, Japan formally annexed Korea with the signing of the Japan-Korea Treaty. Signed by Prime Minister of the Korean Empire Lee Wan-yong and Japanese Resident General of Korea Count Terauchi Masatake, the treaty completed the process of dwindling Korean autonomy that had been furthered by other treaties since 1876. The treaty became effective on August 29th, a week after it was signed, on which day it was also officially promulgated to the public. This marks the beginning of the period of Japanese rule in Korea, during which time Koreans were expected to assimilate with Japanese culture and reject their own. Japanese colonial rule over Korea ended after Japan’s defeat in the Second World War, at which time Korea became an independent nation. In 1965 the treaties between Japan and Korea before 1910 were declared “already null and void”, but a debate continues over whether they were ever legally valid. The legacy of Japanese colonialism remains a controversial one. Many Koreans are still resentful of the treaty, which they believe was invalid as it was forced upon the Koreans, and the years of brutal imperialism that followed. As for the Japanese, there are mixed messages of sincere apology and defiant justification of imperialism; therefore full reconciliation between the two nations is still not complete.

british-history
british-history:

Richard III is Killed at Bosworth Field
22 August 1485
King Richard III, the last king of the House of York, was killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field, on this day in British history, 22 August 1485. The Battle of Bosworth Field was the last significant battle of the Wars of the Roses, the civil war between the Houses of Lancaster and York that raged across England in the latter half of the 15th century. The battle was won by the Lancastrians whose leader, Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, became the first English monarch of the Tudor dynasty. His opponent, Richard III, the last king of the House of York, was killed in the battle, and historians view Bosworth Field as marking the end of the Plantagenet dynasty, making it a defining moment of English and Welsh history.

british-history:

Richard III is Killed at Bosworth Field

22 August 1485

King Richard III, the last king of the House of York, was killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field, on this day in British history, 22 August 1485. The Battle of Bosworth Field was the last significant battle of the Wars of the Roses, the civil war between the Houses of Lancaster and York that raged across England in the latter half of the 15th century. The battle was won by the Lancastrians whose leader, Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, became the first English monarch of the Tudor dynasty. His opponent, Richard III, the last king of the House of York, was killed in the battle, and historians view Bosworth Field as marking the end of the Plantagenet dynasty, making it a defining moment of English and Welsh history.

fapoleon-bonerparte

the-uniformium:

French Garde du Corps du Roi M1814 Officers Helmet

Black varnished leather body and visors trimmed entirely with silver-plated copped fixtures. The body has two large palm leaf scrolls on each side with their curls forward, and the ends terminating behind a silver band that covers the seam between skull and rear visor. The front visor is edged in silver. A large sun ray plate embossed with crown over intertwined scrolls of palms crossing above the face of a deity, all above clouds with a bannered motto "Nec Pluribus Impar" (without comparison under the sun). Screwed to the skull, a crest with feather plume designs on both sides, holds a black chenille of horse hair cropped like a mane and falling forward over the front of the helmet. The ear bosses are sun rays behind the godly face at center, and hold the scalloped, graduating chinscales to the helmet. The chinstraps fasten at the wearer’s chin with a cloth ribbon tie. On the left side, forward to the ear boss, a silver squared tube plume socket holds a two-tiered tulip cup holding the stem of a white cock feather plume. Interior sweatband of leather only. Green color under the front visor and black under the rear visor. 

The Garde du Corps du Roi of the King was the senior unit in the Maison du Roi (House of the King). It was disbanded in 1816. 

teflonly

cross-connect:

Marc Giai-Miniet  is a French artist who makes creepy and fascinating dioramas that tend to feature reproductions of human organs, crime scenes, submarines in basements and wait for it … libraries.

The miniature tableaus are terrific examples of art’s ability to transform seemingly predictable, mundane scenarios into absurd, freakish, and beautiful visual experiences.

Giai-Miniet’s libraries are detailed and striking, replete with book cover art, author names, and identifiable typography. Occasionally a diorama’s title will conjure a loose narrative, an obscure starting point from which the viewer might further consider the art via

:)