peashooter85

peashooter85:

Replica Colt Model 1851 Dragoon single action revolver presented to the Russian Czar and Ottoman Emperor.

In the 1854 Samuel Colt center picture) ordered the production of two heavily decorated Colt Model 1851 Dragoon single action revolvers, which were decorated by master engraver Alvin A. White.  Each revolver featured a portrait of George Washington on the cylinder and the Marquis de Lafeyette on the frame.  Each were heavily decorated with gold inlays and intricate scroll work engraving.  One was presented to Sultan Abdulmecid I, Emperor of the Ottoman Empire (left picture) and Czar Alexander II, Emperor of Russia.  Both leaders were adversaries during the Crimean War, and the purpose of the gifts were to celebrate the end of the war.

The revolver gifted to Abdulmecid II is currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

peashooter85

peashooter85:

Louis XIV —- The Enema King,

(note; this is not a joke, this is historical fact)

In the 16th to 19th century a clyster was an early form of enema administered with a device called a “clyster”, essentially a large syringe which was inserted … you know where.  For millenia regular colon cleansing was a staple of medicine going back to ancient times.  Even the ancient Egyptians hired a special physician called the “Guardian of the Anus” to administer colon cleansing to the Pharaoh.  By the Middle Ages the administration of enemas became a staple among physicians, almost as popular as bloodletting. However the people of 17th century France would take the clyster to a whole new level.

In pre-revolutionary France clyster mania spread across the country’s upper class.  Clysters were administered daily to maintain good health, sometimes being administered multiple times a day, and often containing various herbs and fragrances.  They even became as fashion statement as ladies had regular clysters as a way to preserve beauty and youth.  According to the Duc de Saint-Simon the Duchess of Bourgogne was known to take clysters during parties, often conversing with the king, “while her loyal maid crawled beneath her bejewelled evening gown to administer an enema.”  For such public lavements special clyster syringes were designed with special butt concealment plates.  Curved syringes were also created for those who wanted to self administer, forgoing the need of a servant.

One of the biggest fans of the regular colon cleansing was King Louis XIV. Known as “The Sun King”, Loius XIV installed absolute monarchy in France and was the most powerful man in Europe at the time.  At first Louis XIV would enjoy a once and a while clyster, usually administered after dinner to aid digestion.  However as his reign continued on the King was known to have around three or four clysters a day. His favorite lavement was a mixture of almond oil, honey, and lentitive electuary (a laxative). Being a king who had to manage a powerful empire with limited time, eventually Loius XIV began taking clysters while conferring with government ministers and advisers. Throughout his long reign King Louis XIV recieved in excess of 2,000 clyters.

Calmative Lavement for the King, 1652

30 grammes oil of almond

45 grammes honey

15 grammes lentitive electuary

Mix with warm water.

source

allmesopotamia

richard-miles-archaeologist:

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two

Episode 1 “Come Together”

Uruk was one of the most important cities (at one time the mot important city) in ancient Mesopotamia.

Uruk is considered the first true city in the world, the origin of writing, the first example of architectural work in stone and the building of great stone structures, the origin of the ziggurat, and the first city to develop the cylinder seal which the ancient Mesopotamians used to designate personal property or as a signature on documents. Considering the importance the cylinder seal had for the people of the time, and that it stood for one’s personal identity and reputation, Uruk could also be credited as the city which first recognized the importance of the individual in the collective community.

Starting just under 6.000 years ago, the archaeological record of Uruk reveals a period of intensive building and rebuilding, which went on for four or five centuries. In that period, a dozen or more large public buildings were built; temples, palaces, assembly halls. They used novel building techniques, like -colored stone- cone mosaics (pictures 3-4-5).

PART II

Uruk, Iraq

beautiful-belgium
beautiful-belgium:

1915: A zeppelin flying over Brussels. During the First World War, German dirigibles bombed London, Paris, and many other West-European cities, causing severe terror among civilians. They took off namely in Haren, Evere, where the Germans established a gigantic zeppelin hangar. In retaliation, this aerodrome was bombed in 1915 by the English air force. Brussels was at the heart of the war in Europe, which was not only waged in the trenches, but also involved the people at the home front and on occupied territories. In this configuration, which would come to influence the whole 20th century, the situation of the Belgian capital is unique.
© L’Actualité illustrée

beautiful-belgium:

1915: A zeppelin flying over Brussels. During the First World War, German dirigibles bombed London, Paris, and many other West-European cities, causing severe terror among civilians. They took off namely in Haren, Evere, where the Germans established a gigantic zeppelin hangar. In retaliation, this aerodrome was bombed in 1915 by the English air force. Brussels was at the heart of the war in Europe, which was not only waged in the trenches, but also involved the people at the home front and on occupied territories. In this configuration, which would come to influence the whole 20th century, the situation of the Belgian capital is unique.

© L’Actualité illustrée

un-monde-de-papier

ted:

Can you spot the invisible man? Artist Liu Bolin, known as “The Invisible Man,” paints his body to blend perfectly into the background of everyday Chinese life. Each photograph is an invitation to examine the relationship between the individual and society, an effort to give voice to citizens who are silenced by the Chinese government. In his TED Talk, Bolin explains the lengthy process each photograph requires and the evolution of his powerful message.

Watch the full talk here »

un-monde-de-papier

un-monde-de-papier:

Le château de Chenonceau, en Indre-et-Loire.

Photo 1: cc Yvan Lastes http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Photo 2: cc https://www.flickr.com/photos/deano/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en

Photo 3: cc https://www.flickr.com/photos/blieusong/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en

Photo 4: cc https://www.flickr.com/photos/anselmpallas/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en

Photo 5: cc https://www.flickr.com/photos/etienne_valois/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en

Photos 6,8: cc https://www.flickr.com/photos/sybarite48/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en

Photo 7: cc http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Ra-smit http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html